Paul Nguyen Van-Tam

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Paul Nguyen Van-Tam

Paul Van-Tam
Nicknames Tojo
Born 31 August 1935(1935-08-31)
Died 21 May 2015(2015-05-21) (aged 79)
Education University of Nottingham (BSc 1967)
Years at BGS 1970-1980, and as a supply teacher in the late 1990s and early 2000s
Departments Mathematics; Physics
Subjects Mathematics; Physics
Known for "Tea parties" (his own system of detention)
Notable work(s) Leader of CCF naval section, second in command CCF, later leading the CCF
Children Jonathan Stafford Nguyen Van-Tam, Dominic Nguyen Van-Tam, Monica
Parents Nguyễn Văn Tâm (father)
Relatives Nguyễn Văn Hinh (brother)
Paul Nguyen Van-Tam was a teacher of mathematics and physics at Boston Grammar School.

Obituary

Paul Nguyen Van-Tam, former teacher of mathematics and physics at Boston Grammar School, died on 21 May 2015.

Paul, a French citizen by birth, gained his BSc at the University of Nottingham. His father, Nguyễn Văn Tâm was Prime Minister of the State of Vietnam in 1952/3. His brother, Nguyễn Văn Hinh, who died in 2004, was appointed the Vietnamese National Army Chief of Staff by Emperor Bảo Đại.

He taught at Kitwood Boys School, Boston, and Carre's Grammar School, Sleaford before arriving at BGS. He took charge of the Naval section of the CCF (the school's Combined Cadet Force) and, on the death of Norman Haworth, took overall charge of the CCF.

In 1979 he left BGS to take up the post of Senior Mathematics Master at the City School, Lincoln, though he later returned to BGS as a supply teacher in the 1990s and early 2000s.

Paul leaves two sons and a daughter. His sons both attended BGS: Jonathan Stafford Nguyen Van-Tam and Dominic Nguyen Van-Tam. Jonathan is Professor of Health Protection at the University of Nottingham and Dominic is Manager Pharmacovigilance Data Reporting & Analysis at GSK.

While Paul was a firm master, tending towards strictness, he seems to have been well respected by many of his students, and is reported to have made mathematics "click" for several who were otherwise uninspired by the subject.